Jake and Luke Matheny Form Rare Brother Battery

St. Louis Cardinals manager Mike Matheny has raised a family of ballplayers, including sons Tate, Jake and Luke.  Tate has already progressed to professional baseball and is currently an outfielder in the Boston Red Sox organization, while Jake and Luke are making their way through college baseball.

Jake and Luke are playing on the same Madison Mallards team in the collegiate Northwoods League this summer.  Luke, a pitcher at Oklahoma State, and Luke, a catcher at Indiana,  form the battery for the Mallards and are believed to be the first brother pitcher-catcher combination in the league’s history.

The situation is not unusual for the brothers though, as  they played together growing up.

There have only been a handful of brother battery mates to play together in the major-leagues during the modern day, including Elmer and Johnny Riddle (1949), Bobby and Wilmer Shantz (1955 and 1960), and Ed and Jim Bailey (1959).

To read more about the Matheny brothers, follow the link below from wiscnews.com:

http://www.wiscnews.com/sports/baseball/article_cbcd7079-2534-5b72-b90d-78620e186a7f.html

 

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Tate Matheny Opposes Father’s Team in Spring Training Game

Tate Matheny, who is starting his third season in the Boston Red Sox organization, had a big moment last week when he was called up from his minor league spring training camp in Florida to suit up with the Red Sox against the St. Louis Cardinals.  What made that special was the fact his father, Mike, is the manager of the Cardinals.  It was Tate’s first chance to play with the big-league club.

Tate was the 4th-round pick of the Red Sox in the 2015 MLB Draft.  Last year with Class A Greenville, he posted a .277 average to go along with 5 HR and 52 RBI.

Read more about Tate Matheny’s encounter with his dad from St. Louis Today:

http://www.stltoday.com/sports/baseball/professional/birdland/red-sox-bring-tate-matheny-over-to-face-his-father/article_706ae13f-8020-5cb4-87f5-375e92459fb8.html

Family Ties Flourishing in Baseball – St. Louis Cardinals

Contributed by Richard Cuicchi

This is the fifth in a series of reviews that will take a look at family relationships in each of the thirty major league organizations.

Baseball has more family relationships than any other professional sport. They existed in the earliest days of the sport in the 1870s, and they are abundant in today’s game, perhaps more so than ever before.  Baseball has been called a “generational” sport for several reasons.  One of them is that multiple generations of families have been active in the game–grandfathers, fathers, sons, and brothers.  And now even some great-grandsons are starting to show up on rosters.  Uncles, nephews, cousins and in-laws are part of the extended family of baseball relatives, too.

Baseball bloodlines aren’t limited to just the players. Family trees with a baseball background have commonly included managers, coaches, scouts, owners, executives, front office personnel, umpires, and broadcasters, as well.

Cardinals history is filled with examples of players and non-players that had relatives in baseball. Some of the more noteworthy ones include:

Ken Boyer had an MVP season with the Cardinals in 1964, when they won the National League pennant and defeated the New York Yankees in seven games in the World Series.  Altogether he played seven seasons with the Cardinals, which included seven all-star selections.  He later managed the Cardinals for one full season and portions of two others during 1978 to 1980.  Ken had six brothers who played professional baseball, including Clete and Cloyd who reached the major leagues.  Clete played for the Yankees and opposed his brother in the 1964 World Series, in which they both homered in Game 7.  Cloyd pitched in five major league seasons during 1949 to 1955.  He later coached and scouted for several major league teams.  Ken’s son, David, played five minor league seasons in the Cardinals organization.

Jose Cruz was one of three brothers who played for the Cardinals in the 1970s.  Jose was the best of the three outfielders, putting in 19 major league seasons and recording a .284 career batting average and 1,077 career RBI.  He spent 13 of his seasons with the Houston Astros, where he had two all-star selections.  Jose’s brother, Hector, spent four seasons with the Cardinals as part of a 9-year career, mostly as a reserve outfielder.  Jose’s brother, Cirilo (Tommy), appeared in only three Cardinals games in 1973, and practically all of his pro career was spent in the minors and in Japan.  Hector and Jose once hit home runs while on opposing teams on May 4, 1981.  Jose’s son, Jose Jr., played twelve major league seasons, mostly with the Toronto Blue Jays.  Jose Jr. was runner-up for American League Rookie of the Year in 1997.  Jose had another son, J. E., who played five seasons in the minors.

Chick Hafey played for the Cardinals from 1924 to 1931, contributing to four National League pennant-winning teams.  They won the World Series in 1926 and 1931.  Over his 13-year major-league career, he compiled a .317 batting average and was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1971 by the Veterans Committee.  Chick’s brother, Albert (also nicknamed Chick), pitched for one minor league season in 1913.  Chick had two cousins, Bud and Tom, who played briefly in the majors, and a third cousin, Will, who played in the minors in the 1940s and 1950s.

Lindy McDaniel was one of the top relief pitchers of his era after beginning his career with the Cardinals as a starter in 1955.  Overall, he spent 21 years in the big leagues, including eight with the Cardinals, in which he won 141 games and saved another 174.  Lindy’s brother, Von, only weeks out of high school, joined Lindy at the major-league level with the Cardinals in 1957 and was outstanding pitching prospect.  However, Von he developed a sore arm the next year from which he never recovered.  Von spent the remainder of his nine-year minor-league career as a third baseman and outfielder, but never returned to the majors.  Lindy and Von had a third brother, Butch, who signed with the Cardinals out of high school, but only managed to play three seasons in the minors.

Red Schoendienst has had one of the longest tenures of any Cardinal in history, first as a player, then as a coach and manager.  At age 94, he is still retained by the Cardinals as a special assistant to the Cardinals’ front office.  He played for 19 years in the majors, including 15 with the Cardinals.  He was a 10-time all-star, compiling a .289 career batting average.  He was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1989 by the Veterans Committee.  Schoendienst managed the Cardinals for twelve consecutive seasons, earning a World Series ring in 1967 and other NL pennant in 1968.  He served as an interim manager of the Cardinals in 1980 and 1990, while he was coach for the team.  Red’s son, Kevin, played in the minors for the Cubs organization in 1980 and 1981.  Red had four brothers who played in the minors during the 1940s.

Harry Walker began his 11-year major-league career with the Cardinals in 1940 and had an all-star year before going into military service in 1944 and 1945.  He was dealt to the Philadelphia Phillies in 1947, when he recorded another all-star year leading the National League in batting average (.363) and on-base percentage (.436).  During his last season as a player with the Cardinals in 1955, he replaced Eddie Stanky as manager for the final 118 games.  He later managed the Pittsburgh Pirates for three seasons and the Houston Astros for five seasons.  Harry was the son of Dixie Walker, who pitched for the Washington Senators during 1909 to 1912.  Harry’s brother, also named Dixie, had an 18-year career as an outfielder for five teams, including the Brooklyn Dodgers where he was an all-star in four seasons.  Harry and Dixie are the only brothers to both win major league batting titles.  Harry’s uncle, Ernie Walker, played in the outfield with the St. Louis Browns from 1913 to 1915.

Dizzy Dean was one of the most colorful figures in the history of the game.  He made his mark with the St. Louis Cardinals as part of the Gas House Gang from 1932 to 1937, when he won 134 games.  1934 was his best season, winning 30 games and leading the league in strikeouts on his way to an MVP Award.  The Cardinals, led by Dean’s two victories, captured the World Series title that year.  Dean’s career was impacted by hurting his arm in 1937, as a result of altering his pitching mechanics following a broken toe injury.  Despite his shortened career, he was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1953.  After his playing career, he became a popular radio and TV broadcaster.  Dean’s brother, Paul, also pitched for the Cardinals, winning 19 games in each of the 1934 and 1935 seasons.  For those years, they formed one of the best brother-teammates combos in the history of the game.  In a game against the Brooklyn Dodgers on September 21, 1934, Dizzy pitched a no-hitter in the first game of a doubleheader, while Paul hurled a one-hitter in the second game.

Fast forwarding to more recent times, below are some highlights of baseball relatives in the Cardinals organization during 2016.

Matt Carpenter completed his sixth season with the Cardinals in 2016, which included his third all-star selection.  2013 has been his best season to date, as he compiled a .319 batting average and led the National League in hits and runs.  Matt’s brother, Tyler, was a catcher in the Mets farm system during 2011 and 212.

Greg Garcia, a Cardinals infielder, had the best season of his three-year career on 2016.  He had been a 10th-round pick of the Cardinals in the 2010 MLB Draft.  His brother, Drew, spent eight minor-league seasons in the Chicago White Sox and Colorado Rockies organizations.  Greg’s grandfather, Dave, was a major-league manager from 1977 to 1982 in the California Angels and Cleveland Indians organizations.  Dave played third base in the minors from 1939 to 1957, followed by stints as a minor-league manager and a major-league coach.

Matt Holliday had been a mainstay in the lineup for the Cardinals for seven seasons, although his 2015 and 2016 seasons were marred by injuries.  During his time with the Cards, he compiled a .293 average, 156 HR and 616 RBI, and appeared in two World Series.  With Colorado in 2007, he led the National league in batting average, hits, doubles, and RBI.  Matt is the son of Tom Holliday, who played one season with the Pittsburgh Pirates organization in 1975.  Tom later became head coach and pitching coach at several high-profile colleges.  Matt’s brother, Josh, played two seasons in the Toronto Blue Jays farm system before following his father in the coaching ranks.  He is now the head coach at Oklahoma State, where his father previously held the same job.  Matt’s uncle, Dave Holliday, is currently a scout in the Atlanta Braves organization.  Matt was signed as a free agent by the New York Yankees over the winter.

Jose Martinez made his major league debut with the Cardinals in 2016.  The outfielder/first baseman began his professional career in 2006 at age 17 in the Venezuelan Summer League.  His father is Carlos Martinez, a native Venezuelan who played outfielder/third baseman in the majors during 1988 – 1995.  Jose’s brother, Teodoro, was an outfielder for seven minor-leagues seasons during 2009 to 2015.

Yadier Molina is likely on his way to a Hall of Fame election, having been one of the top catchers of his era.  The 33-year-old began his major league career with the Cardinals in 2004.  Thirteen years later, he has compiled a .284 average, collecting over 1,500 hits and 700 RBI.  Yadier has won eight Gold Glove Awards.  In 89 post-season games, including four World Series, he has hit .289.  Yadier is one of three brothers to have played catcher in the major leagues.  Bengie won a World Series with the Anaheim Angles in 2002.  Jose won World Series titles with the Angels in 2002 and the Yankees in 2009.

Steven Piscotty, a product of the highly-rated Cardinals farm system, played his first full major-league season in 2016.  In 153 games he posted 22 HR, 85 RBI and a .273 average.  Steven had been a first-round draft pick out of Stanford University by the Cardinals in 2012.  His brother, Nick, was selected in the 32nd round by the Kansas City Royals in the 2011 MLB Draft, but did not sign.

Michael Wacha, only one season out of college, gained national attention with the Cardinals in the 2013 post-season, as he won four of five starts.  However, a shoulder injury incurred in 2014 has affected his number of innings in the last four seasons.  His career won-loss record is 33-21 with a 3.74 ERA.  Michael’s uncle, Dusty Rogers, was a first-round pick of the Cincinnati Reds in the January 1984 and went on to pitch five seasons in the minors.

Kolten Wong completed his fourth season with the Cardinals in 2016, when his playing time decreased at second base and he began playing some games in the outfield.  His job security as the regular starter at second is likely in jeopardy for 2017.  Kolten’s brother, Kean, is currently a second baseman in the Tampa Bay Rays organization.

The Cardinals pipeline of baseball relatives includes several top minor league prospects whose relatives played professionally: Tyler Bray, a relief pitcher in his third season in the Cardinals farm system, has a brother, Colin, who is an outfielder in the Diamondbacks organization; Anthony Garcia, who split time between the Double-A and Triple-A levels last year, is the son of former major leaguer Leo Garcia, who is currently a minor-league coach in the Los Angeles Dodgers system; Corey Littrell, a third-generation professional who spent the 2016 season with Triple-A Memphis, is the grandson of former major leaguer Jack Littrell, while his father pitched in the minors from 1977 to 1980; C. J. McElroy, the 3rd-round pick of the Cardinals in the 2011 MLB draft, is the son of former major-league pitcher Chuck McElroy, the nephew of former major-league first baseman Cecil Cooper, and brother of Satchel McElroy, an outfielder in the Cincinnati Reds organization; Casey Turgeon, the 22nd-round pick out of the University of Florida in 2014 who advanced to Double-A last year, is the nephew of Dave Turgeon, a minor league coordinator in the Pittsburgh Pirates organization.

The 2016 Cardinals had their share of baseball relatives in the dugout and front office, too.

David Bell is the current bench coach of the Cardinals.  During his major-league playing career that spanned from 1995 to 2006 with six different major-league clubs, he was a career .257 hitter.  Bell is part of one of only a handful of three-generation players in the history of major-league baseball.  His grandfather, Gus, was a four-time all-star during his nine seasons with the Cincinnati Reds.  Overall, Gus played 15 seasons, ending in 1964.  His father, Buddy, was a five-time all-star and six-time Gold Glove Award winner as a third baseman during his 18 major-league seasons.  Buddy also managed three major league teams and is currently an executive with the Chicago White Sox.  David’s brother, Mike, played briefly with the Cincinnati Reds in 2000 and now currently works in the front office of the Arizona Diamondbacks.

Bill DeWitt, Jr. is owner and chairman of the Cardinals.  He had previously been a part owner/investor with the Baltimore Orioles, Cincinnati Reds, and Texas Rangers.  Bill’s son, Bill DeWitt III, is currently president of the Cardinals.  Bill Jr.’s father, Bill DeWitt, Sr., was a part-owner and general manager of the St. Louis Browns when they won their only American League pennant in 1944.  He later owned the Cincinnati Reds and served in the front offices of the New York Yankees and Detroit Tigers.  Bill Jr. was a batboy for the Browns when his father was affiliated with the team.

Marty Keough is a long-time scout in the Cardinals organization.  He had an eleven-year career as a major league outfielder with six teams without ever having a full-time job.  His brother, Joe, was also a reserve outfielder and first baseman for six major-league seasons, primarily with the Kansas City Royals.  Another brother, Thomas, had a “cup of coffee” in the Boston Red Sox organization in 1954.  Marty’s son, Matt, was a big league pitcher from 1977 to 1987, winning 16 games with the Oakland A’s in 1980.  After his playing career, he served in scouting and executive roles for several clubs.  Marty is the grandfather of Shane Keough, who played four minor league seasons in the A’s organization, and Colton Keough, who was drafted by the Seattle Mariners in 2010, but did not sign.

Mike Matheny completed his fifth year as manager of the Cardinals in 2016.  He has three first-place and two second-place finishes during his tenure, including a National League pennant in 2013.  Matheny was a major-league catcher from 1994 to 2006, including five seasons with the Cardinals.  His son, Tate, an outfielder in the Boston Red Sox farm system, was drafted by the Red Sox in the 4th round in 2015. Mike has two other sons currently in the college ranks:  Luke plays for Oklahoma State University, while Jake plays at Indiana University.

Aaron Looper is currently a scout in the Red Sox organization.  During his 10-season pro career, he appeared in the majors in only one season in 2003 for the Seattle Mariners.  His cousin, Braden Looper, was a relief pitcher in the majors for twelve seasons and currently works in the Cardinals front office.  Aaron’s father, Benny, has been a scout and player development executive in the Seattle Mariners and Philadelphia Phillies organizations.  Aaron’s brother, Jason was selected in the 31st round of the 2000 MLB Draft by the Seattle Mariners, but did not sign.

Derrick May is a minor league hitting instructor in the Cardinals organization.  His father, Dave, was a major-league outfielder from 1967 to 1978, compiling his best season with the Milwaukee Brewers in 1973 with 25 HR, 93 RBI and a .303 batting average.  His brother, Dave Jr., is currently a scout in the Toronto Blue Jays organization.  Derrick’s son, also named Derrick, was the 37th-round pick of the Cardinals in 2013, but did not sign.

Jose Oquendo is currently the third-base coach for the Cardinals.  His son, Eduardo, was the 32nd-round pick of the Cardinals in 2012, but did not sign.

Baseball’s Relatives Website

The entire list of 2016 active major and minor league players and non-players can be retrieved at:

https://baseballrelatives.wordpress.com/2016-family-ties/

 

Father’s Day All-Star Team Rooting for Potential Major League Sons

Contributed by Richard Cuicchi, June 17, 2016

On Father’s Day last year, I compiled a list of major-league all-stars who were fathers of major-league players. The mythical team represented a good look back in history at some dads who were among the best players in the game. There were some pretty good names on the list—Berra, Griffey, Bonds, Raines, and Rose.

To honor baseball dads this year, I’m taking a different twist on the same subject.

The all-star team I’ve compiled this time is indeed comprised of fathers who starred in the big-leagues. However, their sons, who are currently following in their dad’s baseball footsteps, are prospects still grinding their way through college and the minors.

Not that long ago, most of these sons were hanging out with their dads in major league clubhouses or shagging balls in the outfield during dad’s batting practices before games. Those early childhood experiences likely fueled their aspirations to ultimately join the ranks of “major leaguers” like their fathers.

On this Father’s Day, the tables will be turned, since these all-star dads will be pulling for their sons to pitch and hit well enough, so as to improve their chances of one day getting to the “Big Show” themselves.

Starting Pitcher – Roger Clemens won 354 career games and is 3rd on the all-time leader list in career strikeouts.  He won the Cy Young Award a record seven times.  Twice he struck out 20 batters in a game.  He would already be in the Baseball Hall of Fame if it were not for his suspected involvement with PEDs.  Three of Clemens’ sons have followed in his footsteps.  (Note that all the sons’ names begin with “K” – the symbol for “strikeout.”) Kacy and Kody played for the University of Texas this year, after having been drafted by major league teams out of high school. Koby has played in the minors for the Astros and Blue Jays organizations and later in independent league baseball.

Relief Pitcher – Mariano Rivera is the all-time saves leader in baseball with 652.  He pitched in seven World Series for the Yankees and recorded an astonishing 0.70 ERA and 42 saves during his post-season career that included 96 games.  He is a lock to be voted into the Hall of Fame in his first year of eligibility.  Mariano’s son, Mariano III, is a relief pitcher like his father.  He was the 4th round pick of the Washington Nationals in 2015 and is currently pitching at the Class-A level.

Catcher – Mike Matheny played thirteen major league seasons for the Brewers, Cardinals, Blue Jays, and Giants.  While he never played at an all-star level during his career, Matheny developed a keen sense for the game that has allowed him to become one of the top young managers in major league baseball today.  Matheny’s son, Tate, was a fourth-round draft pick of the Boston Red Sox in 2015, and the outfielder currently plays at the Class-A level.  Mike has two other sons with futures in pro baseball. Jake has committed to play for Indiana University, while Luke has committed to Oklahoma State University.

First-Base – Rafael Palmeiro is one of only five players in history to get 3,000 hits and slam 500 home runs in his career.  However, his fabulous career has been stained by failing a drug test during his last season.  Consequently, he won’t likely get elected to what would have otherwise been a sure spot in the Baseball Hall of Fame.  However, his sons have put on the spikes to follow in dad’s footsteps. Patrick played in the Chicago White Sox organization for three seasons and is currently playing in the independent leagues.  Last year, his 50-year-old father came out of retirement for one game to play with Patrick in a league game. Rafael’s other son, Preston, was drafted this year out of North Carolina State University by the Baltimore Orioles in the 7th round.

Second Base – Craig Biggio could have landed a spot on this imaginary all-star team at three different positions.  He has the distinction of being a regular starter for the Houston Astros at three different positions during his career: catcher, second base, and centerfield.  He attained all-star status as a catcher and second baseman.  He compiled over 3,000 hits, 660 doubles, and 1,800 runs scored during a Hall of Fame career. Biggio coached his two sons in high school, and both went on to play baseball at the University of Notre Dame. Cavan was drafted this year by the Toronto Blue Jays in the 5th round. Conor was selected by his dad’s team, the Astros, in the 34th round of the 2015 draft.

Third Base – Dante Bichette was a four-time National League all-star for the Colorado Rockies and was runner-up in the MVP voting in 1995.  He compiled a .299 batting average, 274 home runs, and 1,142 RBI during his 14-year career.  Bichette, coached his son, Dante Jr., in the Little League World Series competition in 2005, and Dante Jr. is now playing in his sixth season in the New York Yankees organization.  Bichette’s other son, Bo, was drafted by the Toronto Blue Jays in the 2nd round of this year’s draft.

Shortstop – Cal Ripken Jr. is the Hall of Fame shortstop best known for his consecutive game streak of 2,632 for the Baltimore Orioles.  He was a 19-time all-star and two-time American League MVP.  His physical size of 6’ 4” and 200 lbs. re-defined the shortstop position in the major leagues during the 1980s.  Ripken comes from a baseball family, as his father was a long-time coach and manager of the Orioles, while his brother Billy played in twelve major league seasons as an infielder.  Cal’s son, Ryan, was drafted in 2012 and then again in 2014, and is now playing at the Single-A level in the Washington Nationals organization.

Outfield – Vladimir Guerrero was often noted as wild-swinging hitter, but he managed to hit 449 home runs, drive in 1,496 runs, and hit for a .318 average during his sixteen-year career.  He was the American League MVP in 2004 and was an all-star selection nine times.  His performance should earn him a spot in Cooperstown.  Guerrero’s 17-year-old son from the Dominican Republic, Vladimir Guerrero Jr., was one of the top international free agents last year and was signed by the Toronto Blue Jays for $3.9 million. However, he has yet to play in the minor leagues in the U. S.  Guerrero Sr. had a brother who also played in the major leagues, and his nephew, Gabby Guerrero, is currently a top prospect in the Arizona Diamondbacks organization.

Outfield – Carl Yastrzemski is one of the all-time great Boston Red Sox players.  He’s in the Hall of Fame based on his career numbers of 452 home runs, 1,844 RBI, and .285 batting average.  He was an all-star in three different decades, the Triple Crown winner in 1967, and MVP of the American League in 1967.  He’s on my list of all-star dads, but in fact he is the grandfather of Mike Yastrzemski, currently playing at the Triple-A level in the Baltimore Orioles organization.  Mike is a third-generation professional player, as his father, also named Mike, played five seasons of minor league baseball.

Outfield – Magglio Ordonez was a six-time all-star in the Chicago White Sox and Detroit Tigers organizations.  During his 15-year career, he managed to hit for a .309 average, slugged 294 home runs and 1,236 RBI.  In 2007, he finished second in MVP voting in the American League.  Ordonez’ 20-year-old son, Magglio Jr., played for Detroit’s rookie league team last season.

Manager – John Farrell is currently in his fourth year as manager of the Boston Red Sox, having claimed a World Series championship in 2013.  A former major league pitcher, Farrell has three sons involved in professional baseball. Luke is currently pitching in the Kansas City Royals organization at the Triple-A level. Jeremy was drafted in 2008 and played in the Pittsburgh Pirates organization last season. Shane was drafted by the Toronto Blue Jays in 2011, but chose a career as a pro scout, currently working in the Chicago Cubs organization.  The three Farrell sons represent a third generation of ballplayers, as their grandfather, Tom, played briefly in the minors in the mid-1950s.

Tate Matheny Expects to Find his Own Way in Baseball

Tate Matheny, the son of St. Louis Cardinals manager Mike Matheny, was recently signed by the Boston Red Sox organization after being selected by them in the fourth round of the 2015 MLB Draft.  He passed up signing a pro contract in 2012, when he was drafted out of high school, and attended Missouri State University for three years.

Matheny is now playing for Lowell of the Class A New York-Penn League.  While he has the name and pedigree of a famous major league father, the younger Matheny realizes that in order to have a successful pro career, he must make it on his own merits.

Read more about Tate Matheny at the link below from baseballessential.com:

http://www.baseballessential.com/news/2015/07/22/red-sox-prospect-tate-matheny-forges-path/

Jake Matheny to Follow Family Tradition in College Sports

Jake Matheny, the son of St. Louis Cardinals manager Mike Matheny, has committed to play baseball at Indiana University for 2016.  Jake will be the fourth sibling in his family to play at the college level.  Both of his parents were also college athletes.

Before his 12-year major league career as a player, Mike Matheny played his college baseball career at the University of Michigan, where his mother, Kristin, played field hockey.

Jake’s older brother, Tate, was recently selected by the Boston Red Sox in the 2015 MLB Draft, after playing at Missouri State University.  Jake’s sister, Katie, currently plays hockey at Ohio State, while his brother, Luke, has committed to pitch at Oklahoma State University.  A fifth, sibling, Blaise, is reportedly a promising baseball prospect.

Read more about Jake Matheny at the link below from The Daily Progress:

http://www.claremoreprogress.com/sports/baseball-family-ties-strong-at-sunbelt-classic/article_85c3cd0a-0f89-11e5-b645-93aa2dae1f34.html

Matheny Takes a Break to Check on Son

During this past spring training, St. Louis Cardinals manager Mike Matheny took a break from the Cardinals’ schedule to check in on his son Tate who was playing for Missouri State in southern Florida.

Tate is a junior outfielder at Missouri State and figures to be selected in the upcoming 2015 MLB Draft.  He is on the watch list for the Golden Spikes Award, the highest honor for a college player.

Read more about Mike and Tate Matheny at the link below from the St. Louis Post-Dispatch:

http://www.stltoday.com/sports/baseball/professional/birdland/matheny-makes-side-trip-to-surprise-son/article_10ab1a76-955a-5d36-b4a7-7506563d6de0.html