Tagged: Felipe Alou

Family Ties Flourishing in Baseball – San Francisco Giants

Contributed by Richard Cuicchi

This is the sixth in a series of reviews that will take a look at family relationships in each of the thirty major-league organizations.

Baseball has more family relationships than any other professional sport. They existed in the earliest days of the sport in the 1870s, and they are abundant in today’s game, perhaps more so than ever before.  Baseball has been called a “generational” sport for several reasons.  One of them is that multiple generations of families have been active in the game–grandfathers, fathers, sons, and brothers.  And now even some great-grandsons are starting to show up on rosters.  Uncles, nephews, cousins and in-laws are part of the extended family of baseball relatives, too.

Baseball bloodlines aren’t limited to just the players. Family trees with a baseball background have commonly included managers, coaches, scouts, owners, executives, front office personnel, umpires, and broadcasters, as well.

Giants’ history is filled with examples of players and non-players that had relatives in baseball. Some of the more noteworthy ones include:

Bobby Bonds made his major league debut with the Giants in 1968, en route to a 14-year major-league career.  He joined the team that featured future Hall of Famers Willie Mays, Willie McCovey, Juan Marichal and Gaylord Perry.  Bonds was no slouch either, as he belted 186 home runs and 552 RBI, while stealing 263 bases in his seven seasons with the Giants.  Over his career, he was selected as an all-star on three occasions and finished in the top four of the MVP Award voting twice.  His son was Barry Bonds, the all-time leader in home runs and fourth on the all-time list for on-base plus slugging percentage.  Barry was the MVP Award winner seven times.  Bobby’s son, Bobby Jr., played professional baseball for seven seasons in the San Diego and San Francisco farm systems from 1992 to 1998.  In the Class A California League All-Star Game in 1997, Bobby Jr. was scheduled to play in the same outfield as Garry Maddox Jr. and Gary Matthews Jr., but injuries to Maddox and Bonds prevented it from occurring.  Maddox and Matthew were sons of former Giants outfielders as well.

Carl Hubbell was a Hall of Fame pitcher who spent his entire 16 years with the New York Giants.  He had five consecutive seasons with 20 or more victories, winning 253 altogether in his career.  The lefty helped the Giants to three National League pennants, including one World Series victory in 1933.  Hubbell gained fame for striking out Babe Ruth, Lou Gehrig, Jimmie Foxx, Al Simmons and Joe Cronin in succession in the 1934 All-Star Game.  Carl had two brothers, John and George, who also played professionally in the Giants and Pirates organizations, respectively.  Carl’s son, Carl Jr., pitched one season in the Giants farm system in 1958.

Hal Lanier was an infielder for the Giants from 1964 to 1971 and spent two more seasons with the New York Yankees before turning to a coaching and managerial career.  He served as a coach for the St. Louis Cardinals and later managed the Houston Astros from 1986 to 1988 earning Manager of the Year honors in 1986.  In 2016 at age 74, he was still managing in the independent leagues.  Hal’s father was Max Lanier, who pitched for the St. Louis Cardinals for 12 seasons.  He was one of a dozen major-league players that jumped to the Mexican League in 1946, lured by higher salaries offered by the league owner.  Max eventually returned to Major League Baseball.

Garry Maddox played three full seasons and part of another with the Giants before being traded to the Philadelphia Phillies in May 1975, where he won seven consecutive Gold Glove Awards as their centerfielder.  He played in two World Series with the Phillies, defeating the Kansas City Royals in 1980.  His son, Garry Jr., was a minor-league outfielder from 1997 to 2003, including a stint with the Phillies.  Garry Sr.’s son, Derrick, played part of one season in the Phillies organization in 1998.

Gary Matthews Sr. played his first five seasons with the Giants, earning Rookie of the Year honors in 1973 and sharing the outfield with Bobby Bonds and Garry Maddox.  Altogether, Matthews played sixteen seasons in the majors, winning a World Series with Philadelphia in 1983.  His son, Gary Jr. played twelve major-league seasons with seven different clubs, making an appearance in the All-Star Game in 2006.  Gary Sr.’s son, Dustin, played one minor-league season in the Chicago White Sox organization.  His son, Del, worked in the White Sox front office.

Don Mueller, part of a three-generation family of players, played ten seasons with the New York Giants, including the 1954 team which upset the heavily-favored Cleveland Indians in the World Series.  Mueller led the league in hits (212) that season, while posting a career-high .342 batting average.  His career average was .296.  Don is the son of Walter Mueller, who played parts of four seasons with the Pittsburgh Pirates from 1922 to 1926.  Don’s brother, Leroy, played in the Red Sox and Yankees organizations in 1947 and 1948.  Don’s son, Mark, was an infielder in the Cardinals and Mets organizations from 1971 to 1973.  Don’s two grandsons played college baseball.

Matt Williams played ten of his seventeen major-league seasons with the Giants, for whom he hit 247 home runs and 732 RBI.  The third baseman was both a Gold Glove and Silver Slugger winner for several seasons.  He played with the 1989 Giants team that won the National League pennant.  Matt managed the Washington Nationals in 2014 and 2015, winning Manager of the Year in his first year.  Matt’s grandfather, Bert Griffith, was a major-league outfielder from 1922 to 1924.  Matt’s son, Jake played two minor-league seasons in the Arizona Diamondbacks farm system.

Fast forwarding to more recent times, below are some highlights of baseball relatives in the Giants organization during 2016.

Gregor Blanco was a reserve outfielder with the Giants in 2016, his fifth season with them.  He is a career.258 hitter with 101 stolen bases.  His twin brother, Gregory, played in the Anaheim Angels farm system in 2003.

Santiago Casilla has been the Giants’ primary closer for the past two seasons.  He has thirteen years in the majors, including six with the Oakland A’s.  He was a member of the Giants’ World Series championship teams in 2010, 2012 and 2014.  Santiago’s brother, Jose, has been a pitcher in the Giants farm system since 2006.

Conor Gillaspie had his second stint with the Giants in 2016, having previously played for them from 2008 to 2012.  The third baseman had a hot bat in September last year, hitting for a .338 average, to help the Giants hang on to a wild-card berth.  His brother, Casey, was a first-round draft pick of the Tampa Bay Rays in 2014 and advanced to the Triple-A level last year.  His father, Mark, was an outfielder and first baseman in the minors from 1981 to 1988.

Derek Law made his major-league debut with the Giants in 2016, serving primarily as a middle reliever.  He had been drafted by the Giants in the 9th round of the 2011 MLB Draft.  His father, Joe, was a starting pitcher for nine seasons in the Oakland A’s farm system.

Hunter Pence, the charismatic leader of the Giants, completed his fifth season with the Giants last year.  He missed a good part of the season due to injury, but still managed to hit thirteen home runs and 57 RBI, while compiling a .289 batting average.  He is a three-time all-star.  His brother, Howard, was a pitcher in the minors from 2003 to 2007.

Hunter Strickland made 72 appearances with the Giants in 2016, mostly in middle relief.  Originally the 18th round draft pick of the Boston Red Sox in 2007, the 6-foot-4 right-hander completed his third season with the Giants last year.  Hunter’s father, Kenneth, pitched one season in the Tigers farm system in 1968.

The Giants’ pipeline of baseball relatives includes several top minor league prospects whose relatives played professionally:

Jonah Arenado hit 17 home runs and 68 RBI for the Giants’ Class A affiliate San Jose in 2016.  His brother is Nolan Arenado, the home run and RBI leader in the National League for the past two seasons. Shawon Dunston Jr. is the son of Giants coach Shawon Dunston, who had an 18-year major-league career.  Shawon Jr. was the 11th-round pick of the Chicago Cubs in 2011. Jacob Heyward was the 18th round pick of the Giants in 2016 and batted .330 in his first pro season.  He is the brother of Jason Heyward of the Chicago Cubs. Dylan Manwaring played in the Giants farm system in 2016.  His father is Kirt Manwaring, former Giants major leaguer and currently a minor-league coach with the Giants. Tyler Rogers played at the Triple-A level in the Giants minor leagues in 2016.  His twin brother, Taylor, made his major league debut in 2016 with the Minnesota Twins as a middle relief pitcher. Jose Vizcaino Jr. appeared in his second season in the Giants farm system last year after being their 7th round pick in the 2015 MLB Draft.  His father, Jose Sr. played two of his eighteen major-league seasons with the Giants.

The 2016 Giants had their share of baseball relatives in the dugout and front office, too.

Felipe Alou is currently a special assistant with the Giants, but got his start in the organization as an outfielder in 1958.  He went on to a 17-year career in which he compiled a .286 batting average and three all-star appearances and then a 14-year managerial career, including four with the Giants.  He is the brother of two former major leaguers, Matty and Jesus.  They became the first trio of brothers to play in the same game on September 10, 1963, when they manned the outfield positions for the Giants.  Felipe’s son, Moises, was a six-time all-star in his seventeen major-league seasons, which included a World Series championship with the Florida Marlins in 1997.  Felipe has three other sons, Felipe Jr., Luis, and Jose, who hold various roles in professional baseball.  Felipe is the uncle of former major league pitcher Mel Rojas, whose best season included a 7-1 record and 1.43 ERA in 68 relief appearances.  Felipe is the cousin of Jose Sosa who pitched in parts of two seasons with the Houston Astros in 1975-1976.

Bruce Bochy, the current Giants manager, is on his way to an eventual Hall of Fame induction.  He has won over 1,700 games in his 22 years as a manager that includes four pennants and three World Series titles.  Brett Bochy had brief stints as a pitcher for his father in 2014 and 2015.

Duane Kuiper is a broadcaster for the Giants, in his 32nd year as a major-league announcer in 2016.  He played in the majors from 1974 to 1985 with the Cleveland Indians and the Giants.  His brother, Jeff, is a broadcast producer for the Giants, while brother Glenn is a broadcaster for the Oakland A’s.

Damon Minor played parts of four seasons as an infielder with the Giants during 2000 to 2004.  He is currently a minor league coach with the Giants.  His twin brother, Ryan, also appeared in four major league seasons in the Baltimore Orioles and Montreal Expos organizations.  They are one of only eight sets of twins to appear in the majors.

Jorge Posada Sr. is a long-time major league scout, currently working in the Giants organization.  He is the father of Jorge Posada Jr., a 17-year, five-time all-star catcher with the New York Yankees.  Jorge Sr.’s brother, Leo, was a major-league outfielder for the Kansas City A’s in 1960 -1962.

Dave Righetti completed his 17th season as the Giants’ pitching coach in 2016.  He pitched for sixteen major-league seasons, primarily as a reliever for the New York Yankees, compiling an 82-79 record and 252 saves.  His father, Leo, was an infielder in the minor leagues from 1944 to 1957.  Dave’s brother, Steven, was an infielder in the Texas Rangers organization from 1977 to 1979.

The father-son combo of Paul Turco Jr. and Paul Turco Sr. are currently scouts in the Giants organization.  Paul Sr.’s son, Anthony, is a scout for the Boston Red Sox.  Both of his sons previously played in the minors.

Baseball’s Relatives Website

The entire list of 2016 active major and minor league players and non-players can be retrieved at:

https://baseballrelatives.wordpress.com/2016-family-ties/

 

Family Ties Flourishing in Baseball: New York Yankees

Contributed by Richard Cuicchi

This is the first of a series of reviews that will take a look at family relationships in each major league organization.

Baseball has more family relationships than any other professional sport. They existed in the earliest days of the sport in the 1870s, and they are abundant in today’s game, perhaps more so than ever before.  Baseball has been called a “generational” sport for several reasons.  One of them is that multiple generations of families have been active in the game–grandfathers, fathers, sons, and brothers.  And now even some great-grandsons are starting to show up on rosters.  Uncles, nephews, cousins and in-laws are part of the extended family of baseball relatives, too.

Baseball bloodlines aren’t limited to just the players. Family trees with a baseball background have commonly included managers, coaches, scouts, owners, executives, front office personnel, umpires, and broadcasters, as well.

Indeed, families with a heritage of baseball are similar to those with military, medical, jurisprudence, and agricultural backgrounds. Their professions are often passed down from one generation to the next.  Likewise, professional baseball fathers generally want their sons to follow in their footsteps.  Brothers grow up pushing each other to excel on the diamond.  Once one brother gets drafted by a major league team, then it’s often the case his brother will try to follow.

A look back in history shows many fascinating stories about baseball families. For example:

  • the Hairston family, which included a major league father (Sam), three sons (two in the majors—John and Jerry Sr.), and five grandsons (two in the majors—Jerry Jr. and Scott), collectively had professional careers that spanned from 1945 to 2014.
  • three Alou brothers (Felipe, Matty, and Jesus) played for the San Francisco Giants in the same game in 1963. The trio had two cousins who followed them in the big leagues, and one of the trio, Felipe, also had four sons to play professionally.
  • the Boyer brood included seven brothers that played professionally, including three major leaguers (Cloyd, Ken, and Clete). They then produced three sons who played in the minors.

Numerous players of the 1960s New York Yankees teams had offspring who wound up playing professional baseball. Follow the link below to an article entitled “Sons of the 1960s Bronx Bombers Had Big Shoes to Fill.”

https://baseballrelatives.wordpress.com/2016/02/16/sons-of-the-1960s-bronx-bombers-had-big-shoes-to-fill/

Fast-forwarding to more recent times, here are some highlights of baseball relatives in the New York Yankees organization during 2016.

Brian McCann completed his third season as the Yankees catcher, after seven all-star seasons with the Atlanta Braves during 2005-2013.  He was traded to the Houston Astros during the off-season.  His brother, Brad, was a minor league first baseman in the Florida Marlins and Kansas City Royals organizations during 2004-2007.  McCann’s father, Howard, was drafted (8th round) by the Minnesota Twins in 1974, but did not sign.  He later played one season in the independent leagues.

Austin Romine got the most playing time in his five-year career with the Yankees in 2016, serving as a backup to Brian McCann.  But now that Gary Sanchez has taken over the starting catcher’s job, Romine will likely continue as a reserve.  Romine is in one of those rare families that had a father and a brother in major-league baseball.  His father, Kevin, was a major league outfielder in the Red Sox organization from 1985 to 1991, when he was also a backup player to regulars like Jim Rice, Dwight Evans, and Mike Greenwell.  His brother, Andrew, was perhaps the ultimate utility player last season for the Detroit Tigers, as he played every position except catcher.

Mason Williams is a 24-year-old outfielder who played sparingly in his second season with the Yankees.  He doesn’t hit for much power, but uses his speed well on the bases and in the outfield.  He is the grandson of Walt Williams, who played in the outfield from 1964 to 1975, primarily with the Chicago White Sox.  Nicknamed “No Neck”, he made his major-league debut as a 20-year-old with the Houston Colt .45s.  He was a career .270 hitter, and logged two seasons with the Yankees before wrapping up his career.

Dustin Ackley was starting his second year with the Yankees in 2016, but his season was cut short in late May due to injury.  The outfielder/first baseman had been a regular with the Seattle Mariners after being a first-round draft pick (second overall) in 2009.  He is the son of John Ackley, a third-round draft pick of the Boston Red Sox in 1979, who never made it out of the minors.

Aaron Hicks played his first season with the Yankees in 2016 after three seasons with the Minnesota Twins.  Hicks was primarily a starter in the outfield alongside Jacoby Ellsbury and Brett Gardner.  He batted a meager .217 with 8 HR and 31 RBI.  Hicks is the son of Joseph Hicks, who reached the Double-A level with the San Diego Padres and Kansas City Royals organizations before retiring in 1981.

Kirby Yates.  Yates was acquired by the Yankees before the 2016 season to fill a middle relief role in their bullpen.  In his third major league season, he made 41 appearances while averaging almost 11 strikeouts per nine innings.  However, he posted an ineffective 5.23 ERA and WHIP of 1.452.  Yates signed with the Los Angeles Angels for the 2017 season.  His brother, Tyler, was a major-league relief pitcher for five seasons during 2004-2009.  He had a career 12-17 record with the Braves, Mets, and Pirates.

Chasen Shreve.  He was another middle relief pitcher for the Yankees who struggled in 2016, after posting a fine season the year before, including a 6-2 record and 3.09 ERA.  He has a brother, Colby, who pitched in the Philadelphia Phillies organization from 2010 to 2013.  Both of the brothers were drafted from College of Southern Nevada.

Several other Yankee players, who briefly appeared on the major-league roster during 2016, had relatives that played in the major leagues: Eric Young Jr. (son of Eric Young Sr.), Donovan Solano (brother of Jhonatan Solano), and Ike Davis (son of Ron Davis, a former Yankee)

The Yankees’ pipeline of baseball relatives includes several top prospects whose relatives were former major-league all-stars: Dante Bichette Jr. (son of Dante Bichette Sr.), Jose Mesa Jr. (son of Jose Mesa Sr.), and Michael O’Neill (nephew of Paul O’Neill).

The Yankees had a number of personnel filling non-playing roles in the organization during 2016.

Brothers Hal and Hank Steinbrenner are the principal owners of the Yankees, having taken over for their legendary father, George Steinbrenner, following his death in 2010.

Tony Pena completed his 11th season as coach for the Yankees, having served as both a base coach and bench coach under managers Joe Torre and Joe Girardi.  Pena was manager of the Kansas City Royals during 2002-2005.  He also had an 18-year major league career that included five all-star seasons.  He has two sons that have played in the majors:  Tony Francisco Pena was a shortstop who played from 2006 to 2009 in the Atlanta Braves and Kansas City Royals organizations; and Francisco Antonio Pena is currently a catcher in the Baltimore Orioles organization.  Pena also had a brother, Ramon, who pitched briefly with the Detroit Tigers in 1989.

Brothers Lou and Rob Cucuzza have been long-time clubhouse and equipment managers at Yankee Stadium.  They previously served with their father, Lou Sr., who also had an extensive career in similar capacities with the Yankees.

Kyle Arnsberg is a coach in the Yankees’ minor league system.  He is the son of former Yankees major league player Brad Arnsberg, who is now a minor league coordinator in the Arizona Diamondbacks organization.

Mark Littlefield is a trainer in the Yankees organization.  He is the brother of David Littlefield, currently an executive in the Detroit Tigers organization, and Scott Littlefield, currently a scout in the Texas Rangers organization.

Ken Singleton is currently a broadcaster for the Yankees.  He previously had a 15-year major-league playing career with the Montreal Expos and Baltimore Orioles.  His son, Justin, played for six seasons in the Toronto Blue Jays organization, reaching the Triple-A level.

 Baseball’s Relatives Website

The entire list of 2016 active major and minor league players and non-players can be retrieved at:

https://baseballrelatives.wordpress.com/2016-family-ties/

 

Trio of Alou Brothers Made History in 1963

Contributed by Richard Cuicchi

On September 13, 1963, brothers Felipe, Jesus, and Matty Alou made baseball history when they played in the same outfield for the San Francisco Giants. At the time, the occasion may have been a promotional gimmick by the Giants, since Matty and Jesus were at the beginning of their careers, surrounded by uncertainty they would be sticking around with the Giants much longer since they were competing for regular jobs with their older brother and future Hall of Famers, Willie Mays and Willie McCovey.  Regardless, the feat hasn’t occurred again since.

As it turned out though, all three Alou brothers wound up having significant careers in the major leagues, altogether encompassing 47 seasons. Felipe and Matty became all-stars, Matty won a batting championship, and Jesus was a member of two World Series championship teams.  Felipe also had a 10-year managerial career.

The Alous’ extended baseball family eventually included other major leaguers, nephew Mel Rojas and cousin Jose Sosa. Felipe had several sons who also played professional baseball, including Moises who became a major league all-star himself.  Mel Rojas’s brother and son were minor leaguer players.

Following is a look back at the careers of the history-making Alou brothers.

Felipe Alou

Felipe began his baseball career with very humble beginnings. Born into a poor family in the Dominican Republic, gloves made out of strips of canvas and bats lathed from scrap wood were his first exposure to baseball.  While he excelled in baseball and track as a youngster, it was his parents’ desire that become a doctor.  In fact, he enrolled in the university for one year with his tuition paid by the state.  But it soon became evident he would not have enough money for the books, clothing and food required to stay in school.

After attracting attention in the Pam American Games, the New York Giants signed him to a contract at age 20 and sent him to Lake Charles, Louisiana, in the Evangeline League. He immediately became controversial because this league did not allow black players at that time.  His mother was a white native of Spain and his father was black.  However, the Louisiana governor’s office declared he was black, forcing the Giants to ship him to the Florida State League after only five games at Lake Charles.

Felipe was the first of the three Alou brothers to play in the major leagues. Considered an everyday, consistent player, he played 17 total seasons, primarily with the Giants and Braves.  He broke in with the Giants on June 8, 1958, their first year on the West Coast.  It was at a time when Willie Mays, Willie McCovey, and Orlando Cepeda were getting all the attention on the club.  However, Felipe hit .316 and a career-high 98 RBI for the NL pennant-winning Giants in 1962.

After being traded to Milwaukee in 1964, he led the National League in at-bats and hits in 1966 and 1968. He finished second in batting average to his brother Matty in 1966, the only time this happened in major league history.  That same year, he hit a career-high 31 home runs.   He appeared in the first League Championship Series in 1969, when Atlanta faced the New York Mets.

Felipe was often placed in the batting lineup as a leadoff hitter. On two occasions, July 26-27, 1965, and August 9-10, 1966, he hit leadoff home runs in consecutive games.  He is among the career leaders in leadoff home runs with 20. He combined with four other Giants players to hit consecutive home runs in the 9th inning of a game on August 31, 1961.  On another occasion, April 30, 1961, he hit one of eight homes in a game by Giants players against the Braves.  In 1968 he had a 22-game hitting streak with the Braves.

At the end of the 1969 season, Felipe was traded to the Oakland Athletics and finished his career in the American League by 1974. During his career, he made the All-Star team three times.  Felipe was one of only three players in history to play for the Milwaukee Braves and Brewers teams.  Hank Aaron and Phil Roof were the others.

Felipe spent twelve years managing in the minor leagues, as well as many seasons of winter ball in the Dominican Republic. He became the first Dominican manager in the majors when he succeeded Tom Runnells of the Montreal Expos in May 1992.   He had previously coached at every level in the Expos organization.  Although he was noted for his low-key approach, his philosophy of managing was simple:  “Don’t be afraid to fail.  Play to win, don’t play not to lose.”  His initial Montreal clubs included his son, Moises, and nephew, Mel Rojas.

Felipe resurrected the Expos franchise, finishing first or second in four of his first five seasons. He was selected the National League Manager of the Year in the strike-shortened season of 1994.  He led a young Expos team to the best record in the majors that year, but unfortunately the team did not play in the post-season, because of the strike.

The Expos operated with a lean budget and as a result the players were consistently among the lowest paid in the league. Yet Alou was noted for being somewhat of a miracle worker by getting the most out the talent dealt him.  However, with the Expos competing in the same division with the best National League team of the ‘90s, the Atlanta Braves, they could never rise above a mediocre status.

He became the manager of the San Francisco Giants for 2003 and promptly led them to a NL West Division title by winning 100 games, their most since 1993. He managed the Giants for three more seasons before becoming a special assistant to the Giants’ general manager.

During his playing career, Felipe compiled a .286 batting average, 2,101 hits, 985 runs, 206 home runs, and 852 RBI. He was a three-time All-Star and finished fifth in the National League MVP voting in 1966, when he had a career year leading the league in hits, runs, and total bases.  As a manager, his career record was 1,033 wins and 1,021 losses.

In addition to major leaguer Moises Alou, Felipe had three other sons who played baseball professionally. Luis Rojas was signed by the Orioles. Jose Alou played in the Expos organization, while Felipe Alou Jr. played in the Royals organization. He also had another nephew, Francisco Rojas, who played in the major leagues.

Jesus Alou

Jesus was the youngest of the three Alou brothers who played in the major leagues. He was signed by the Giants as a 16-year-old and began his professional career in 1959 as a pitcher.  He converted to an outfielder and made his major league debut on September 10, 1963, with the San Francisco Giants.

He played a total of six seasons with the Giants, hitting .298 and .292 in two of those seasons. Like his brother Matty, he was not known as a power hitter, with 9 home runs and 52 RBI in 1965 being his career best in each of those categories.

When the National League expanded after the 1968 season, Jesus was drafted by the Montreal Expos from the expansion player list, but they traded him to Houston for the 1969 season.

He played three full seasons and part of a fourth for the Astros, and then was traded to Oakland just in time to help them into the World Series in 1973. In 1974 as a reserve outfielder, he again appeared with Oakland in their third straight World Series.  He played for the Mets in 1975, sat out for two years, and then completed his career with two more years at Houston.  Beginning in 1972 he was frequently filling a pinch-hitter role and finished his career with 82 pinch-hits.

Jesus got six hits in a game on July 10, 1964, against the Cubs. Each of his hits came off a different pitcher.  On July 17, 1966, he equaled a National League record when he grounded into a double play three times in the second game of a doubleheader.

For his career, he hit for a .280 average and produced 1,126 hits, 32 home runs and 377 RBI. When he got his 1,000th career hit with the Astros in 1972, it made the Alou brothers the only major league trio to get over 1,000 hits in their careers.  In 1979, he was a coach for the Houston Astros.

Matty Alou

Matty followed his older brother’s footsteps with the San Francisco Giants when he made his major league debut on September 26, 1960. He spent six seasons with the Giants as a reserve player, primarily because the Giants’ outfield was already crowded with such hitters as Willie Mays, Willie McCovey, Harvey Kuenn, and his brothers.

Matty was traded to the Pittsburgh Pirates after the 1965 season, and he immediately became a star as a full-time player. He led the National League in hitting (.342) in 1966, beating out his brother Felipe, who finished in second place.  That year he was part of a .300-hitting outfield with Willie Stargell and Roberto Clemente.  Matty would go on to be among the top ten in his league in batting average and top five in hits for five more seasons.  He is one of eight major league players who got 200 hits in a season (1970) and still batter under .300.

Following his five-year stint with the Pirates, he played with the Cardinals, A’s, Yankees and Padres, still managing to hit well.

Matty retired after the 1974 season with a .307 career batting average, 1,777 hits and 236 doubles. He had very little power, as he hit only 31 home runs and 427 RBI over fifteen seasons.  In fact, in 1968 he went an entire season (558 at-bats) with no home runs.

Matty appeared in World Series games with the Giants in 1962 and Oakland A’s in 1972. He was a National League All-Star in 1968 and 1969.  Following his major league career, he played three years for the Taiheiyo Club Lions in Japan.

 

Baseball Is A Family Affair For Rojas

Luis Rojas is the manager of the Savannah Sand Gnats, the New York Mets affiliate in the South Atlantic League. His bloodlines include some big-time major leaguers. His father is Felipe Alou, a 17-year veteran player in the big leagues and a former major league manager for 14 seasons with the Montreal Expos and San Francisco Giants. His brother is former major league all-star Moises Alou.

Luis learned a lot from both his father and his brother and led to his eventually taking a minor league manager’s job following his own playing days. He hopes to take the family name to another step.

See related story about Luis Rojas at the link below from WSAV.com:
http://www.wsav.com/story/25944958/rojas-makes-baseball-a-family-affair