Kowano Brothers Managed Major League Clubhouses

Yosh and Nobe Kawano emerged from concentration camps for the Japanese during World War II to become long-standing employees of two of the most historic major-league franchises.  They didn’t play baseball themselves, instead holding jobs that made sure major-league clubhouses were in tip-top shape to support the ballplayers.

Yosh spent nearly 65 years in the clubhouses at Wrigley Field for the Chicago Cubs, while Kawano had a similar job in the Dodgers organization.  Both brothers are now in their mid-90s.

To read more about the Kowano brothers, follow the link below from the Chicago Tribune:

http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/ct-met-cubs-kawano-brothers-20171016-story.html

 

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Yuli Gurriel’s Baseball Lineage has Cuban Roots

Houston Astros first baseman Yuliesky Gurriel is a 33-year-old rookie this year.  The reason for his late start in the major leagues is that he defected from Cuba in early 2016, along with his brother Lourdes Jr.

Before coming to the United States, Yuli had a 15-year career in Cuba, where he played professionally and helped the national team win gold medals in the 2004 Olympics and the World Cup in 2003 and 2005.

He is the son of Lourdes Gurriel Sr., who was a long-time player and coach in Cuba.  Yuli’s brother signed a professional contract with the Toronto Blue Jays last November and played in their farm system this season.

To read more about Yuli Gurriel’s career, follow the links below:

http://m.startribune.com/astros-gurriel-goes-from-cuban-star-to-world-series-hopeful/451787383/?section=sports

http://www.torontosun.com/2017/10/17/gurriel-brothers-keeping-in-touch-during-mlb-playoffs

Luke Farrell Faces His Father’s Team in MLB Game

In the first time they were on the same field together, Cincinnati Reds pitcher Luke Farrell played against his father’s Boston Red Sox team.  John Farrell is the manager of the Red Sox.  It was the first time a son pitched against his father’s team in the majors.

Luke pitched a scoreless inning in the 9th, as Boston won the game, 5-0.

He was selected by the Kansas City Royals in the sixth round of the 2013 MLB Draft.  He had made his major-league debut with the Royals on July 1, but then was purchased by the Los Angeles Dodgers.  The Reds claimed him off waivers on August 9.

John is a former major-league pitcher during 1987 to 1996.  He has managed the Red Sox since 2013 and previously managed the Toronto Blue Jays in 2011 and 2012.

Luke has two brothers in professional baseball.  Jeremy is a minor-league coach in the Cjhicago Cubs organization, while Shane is a scout with the Cubs.

For more information about Luke’s game against his dad, follow the link below:

http://m.redsox.mlb.com/news/article/255755128/luke-farrell-faces-john-farrells-red-sox/

 

Mel Didier’s Passing Recalls Prominence of Louisiana Baseball Family

Contributed by Richard Cuicchi

Mel Didier’s passing on September 11 is a reminder that few baseball families have had as big an impact on a specific area of the country as his family did in South Louisiana.

Didier, whose professional baseball career spanned nearly fifty years, made his mark in baseball as a well-regarded scout and front office executive for several major-league clubs. Named after Mel Ott, he was involved in administrative posts at the start-up of three expansion franchises:  1969 Montreal Expos, 1977 Seattle Mariners, and 1997 Arizona Diamondbacks.  Up until the time of his death, he was a special assistant with the Toronto Blue Jays organization.

Mel’s father, Irby Didier, was the patriarch of the sports family, which included six sons (Pearce, Clyde, Robert, Mel, Raymond, and Gerald) who played, coached, managed, and scouted at various levels of high school, collegiate, and professional baseball. Irby played semi-professionally (for Marksville), as did Pearce (an outfielder with Thibodaux and manager of the Homer Louisiana Oilers) and Clyde (a catcher for the Baton Rouge Red Sticks).

Robert Irby Didier Jr., was a minor-league catcher in 1940 with Greenville in the Cotton States League before going into military service during World War II. He sustained wounds during his service that prevented him from continuing a pro baseball career, although he was later able to participate in semi-pro leagues in the Baton Rouge area.

Gerald Didier, was a second baseman in the Brooklyn Dodgers organization from 1952 to 1954, and then played a season in the Mexican League in 1955. After a season in the South Atlantic League in 1956, he concluded his pro career with Baton Rouge in the Evangeline League in 1957, when he batted a career-high .327.

Raymond Didier played pro baseball with Port Arthur of the Evangeline League in 1940 before becoming the head baseball and football coach at Southwestern Louisiana Institute (now University of Louisiana Lafayette) in the 1950s. From 1957 to 1963, he was the head baseball coach at LSU, claiming an SEC baseball championship in 1961.  Raymond was an assistant coach for the football team during that time period as well.  He then served as the head baseball coach and athletic director at Nicholls State University from 1963 to 1978.  The baseball field at Nicholls State is named in his honor.

Mel’s son, Bob “Hiya” Didier, was a major-league catcher from 1969 to 1974 for the Atlanta Braves, Boston Red Sox, and Detroit Tigers. He was selected by the Braves in the fourth round of the 1967 MLB Draft out of Glenn Oaks (LA) High School and reached the majors with the Braves at age 20.  After his playing career ended in 1976, he got he first job as a minor-league manager in the Braves organization at age 28.  Over his career, he managed in the minors for 15 seasons, including stints at the Triple-A level in the Astros and Blue Jays organizations.  Bob served on the big-league coaching staffs of the Oakland A’s (1984-1986) and Seattle Mariners (1989-1990), as well as scouted in the New York Yankees and Chicago Cubs organizations.

Beau Didier, son of Bob Didier and the family’s fourth-generation ballplayer, was selected by the Pittsburgh Pirates in the 40th round of the 2008 MLB Draft, out of Bellarmine High School in Tacoma, Washington.  However, the catcher/infielder committed to LSU, where he lettered in three seasons (2010-2012).

Mel earned letters in football (1944-1945) and baseball (1947) at LSU before beginning his professional baseball career as a player in 1948 and 1949. However, he soon turned to coaching at the high school level, where his 1953 Baton Rouge Catholic High team captured their first state championship baseball title.  That team, which Didier dubbed “one of the greatest high school teams in American history,” featured four players who went on to sign pro contracts and seven who accepted college scholarships to play baseball.

He served as a scout in the Detroit Tigers, Milwaukee Braves, Atlanta Braves, Los Angeles Dodgers, Cleveland Indians, and Baltimore Orioles organizations. He was involved in player development roles for the Montreal Expos, Seattle Mariners, and Arizona Diamondbacks organizations, as these franchises were getting off the ground.  Some of the major-league players whose careers he influenced included Hall of Famers Andre Dawson, Gary Carter, Mike Piazza, and Eddie Murray.

At the college level, Didier was the LSU freshman team football coach in 1967 and 1968, head baseball coach at the University of Southwestern Louisiana (now ULL) in 1981-1982, and athletic director at USL in 1982.

Mel received the “Legends in Scouting” Award in 2009, presented by the Professional Baseball Scouts Foundation. He authored “Podnuh, Let Me Tell You a Story,” a book about his baseball life.

Mel died at age 90 in Phoenix, Arizona.

Chad Wallach Gets Call-up to Majors

Chad Wallach got his first major-league call-up this week, as the Cincinnati Reds needed a catcher to backfill for two other players who had taken leave for the birth of their children.

Chad was a fifth-round pick of the Miami Marlins in the 2013 MLB Draft.  He joined the Reds organization in 2015.   This season was his first at the Triple-A level.

Chad is the son of current Marlins coach Tim Wallach, who had a 17-year career, primarily with the Montreal Expos.  Chad has two brothers, Brett and Matt, who had brief professional careers.

To read more about Chad Wallach, follow the link below from the Dayton Daily News:

http://www.daytondailynews.com/sports/baseball/chad-wallach-life-father-like-son/GmxSfUHvboIiCuCaxMHg0J/

Jose Mota Has Historic Broadcasting Career

Jose Mota recently made history by becoming the first major-league broadcaster to do play-by-play on a team’s English and Spanish radio broadcasts and to do color analyst work on English and Spanish television broadcasts.  He has worked for the Los Angeles Angels for 16 years in these various capacities.

Jose is the son of Manny Mota who spent 20 seasons in the major-leagues, primarily with the Los Angeles Dodgers and Pittsburgh Pirates.  He later became a coach for the Dodgers.

Jose got his start in baseball as a player.  He spent twelve seasons in professional baseball, including two brief seasons in the big leagues with the San Diego Padres and Kansas City Royals.

Jose has four brothers who also played professional baseball.  Andy played part of one season with the Houston Astros in 1991.  Domingo played during 1990 and 1995 in the Dodgers, Royals, and Reds organizations.  Gary played professionally between 1990 and 1997, primarily with the Astros.  Tony played in the minors and independent leagues from 1996 to 2006, primarily with the Dodgers.

For more information about Jose’s broadcasting career, see the link below from the Los Angeles Times:

http://www.latimes.com/sports/mlb/la-sp-angels-mota-shaikin-20170826-story.html

 

Kuiper Brothers Keep it Friendly

Brothers Duane and Glen Kuiper might be broadcasters for opposing San Francisco Bay area major-league teams, but there’s no sibling rivalry between them and are able to keep it friendly away from the diamond.

Duane was a former major-league player from 1974 to 1985, ending his career with the San Francisco Giants.  Now he is one of the broadcasters for the Giants.

Glen had a brief minor-league career in 1985-1986 and is currently a broadcaster with the Oakland A’s.

To read more about the Kuiper brothers, follow the link below from Diablo Magazine:

http://www.diablomag.com/August-2017/The-Bay-Areas-Kuiper-Brothers/